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Aug8
HISTORIC RE-ENACTORS ADD AUTHENTICITY TO HERMIONE 2015 VOYAGE
Aug5
Say Au Revoir to The Hermione: Last Stop in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia Before Returning to France
Jul28
Lafayette at Monticello: “The Happy days I Have Past” : A Talk with Assistant Curator Emilie Johnson, Monticello
Jul21
A Talk with Ursula Reed, Chair, Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route, and Dr. Robert Selig, Historian, W3R-US
Jul18
HERMIONE MAKES A BIG IMPACT IN CASTINE, MAINE – ON BASTILLE DAY, JULY 14, 2015
Jul13
HERMIONE FRIGATE ARRIVES IN BOSTON TO TUMULTUOUS WELCOME ON JULY 11, 2015
Jul11
A Talk with David Dearinger, Curator of Lafayette: An American Icon at the Boston Athenæum
Jul10
Hermione Arrives in Historic Newport, Rhode Island
Jul9
Greenport, NY Greets Hermione with Great Fanfare July 6-7 Visit Warmly Welcomed on Long Island
Jul5
HERMIONE FRIGATE IN VIEW OF THE STATUE OF LIBERTY DURING JULY 4 PARADE OF SHIPS
Jul2
Triumphant Arrival of Hermione to New York’s Pier 15 at South Street Seaport Museum
Jun29
THE HERMIONE RE-ENACTMENT DINNER AT PHILADELPHIA’S CITY TAVERN IS AN AUTHENTIC BLAST! Marquis-mania Enlivens Philadelphia Waterfront with Tall Ships
Jun25
FRENCH-AMERICAN LIAISON EXTRAORDINAIRE: A TALK WITH NICOLE YANCEY
Jun22
HERMIONE’S BENEDICT DONNELLY SPEAKS IN ANNAPOLIS
Jun17
A Conversation with Paul Raschilla, Partner, AKF Group A Supporter of Hermione’s Visit to the Inner Harbor, Baltimore, Maryland
Jun10
Fireworks At Mount Vernon, Virginia During Hermione’s Visit on June 9, 2015
Jun8
Hermione Arrives In Yorktown With A Bang!
Jun2
Rendezvous of France’s Hermione and U.S. Navy’s USS Mitscher Off Virginia Coast
Jun1
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION HERMIONE-LA FAYETTE
May29
A Talk with Dr. Valerie Paley, New-York Historical Society on Its Current Exhibit: “Lafayette’s Return: The “Boy General,” the American Revolution, and the Hermione.”
May26
The Florida Friends of Hermione-Lafayette in America Host Four Successful Fundraisers Collecting $200,000
May7
Lafayette’s Arrival on April 27, 1780 Celebrated By Massachusetts Lafayette Society On Hancock’s Wharf, Boston
May5
Hermione-Lafayette President Miles Young Addresses Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island
Apr30
WORLD PREMIERE OF LAFAYETTE,
Apr13
LAFAYETTE, THE PLAY at FIAF’s Florence Gould Hall Theater in New York
Apr7
LAFAYETTE COMES ALIVE: A TALK WITH LAURENT FERRI, CURATOR AND ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, CORNELL UNIVERSITY
Apr2
Lafayette’s Key Role in the American Revolution is Celebrated in a New Society of the Cincinnati Exhibit
Mar25
FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA GATHER IN PALM BEACH FOR CELEBRATORY GALA
Mar24
Gérard Araud, French Ambassador Welcomes Friends of Hermione-Lafayette in America, Inc. at Washington, D.C. Reception
Mar18
PRINCE CHARLES LEARNS OF HERMIONE’S VISIT TO GEORGE WASHINGTON’S MOUNT VERNON
Mar15
Commonwealth of Virginia Declares March 14 as Lafayette Day
Mar14
Hermione Frigate Welcomes Hennessy on Board
Mar9
HERMIONE’S ARTISANAL ACHIEVEMENT
Feb18
AHOY! HERMIONE SETS SAIL TO AMERICA….AGAIN!
Feb14
French Language Students in New England Invited To Enter Hermione Contest
Jan31
Hermione-Lafayette Rallies Support in Coral Gables, Florida
Jan18
2015 – The Year of Hermione Comes to the United States
Dec23
FRANCE MAGAZINE DEVOTES COVER STORY TO THE HERMIONE!
Dec9
THE MARQUIS: LAFAYETTE RECONSIDERED
Dec8
FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA SALUTE OUR ARMED FORCES ON VETERANS DAY
Dec4
LAFAYETTE SYMPOSIUM AT LYCÉE FRANÇAIS DE NEW YORK
Dec4
NYC GATHERING WITH MILES YOUNG, PRESIDENT, FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA
Dec3
BRITISH TRAVEL WRITERS COMMEND HERMIONE FRIGATE PROJECT IN 2014
Nov12
ABOARD HERMIONE: MARC JENSEN’S LOG NOTES
Oct15
GALA HIGHLIGHTS FROM FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA ON THE USS INTREPID
Oct14
FOH-LA’S MARC JENSEN ON BOARD HERMIONE IN BORDEAUX!
Oct10
HERMIONE’S TRIUMPHAL ARRIVAL IN BORDEAUX!
Sep16
THE SIEGE WILL COMMENCE TOMORROW AT YORKTOWN
Sep8
HERMIONE ON ITS WAY TO THE ATLANTIC!
Sep6
HAPPY BIRTHDAY LAFAYETTE!
Sep2
THE PERILS OF PEACE – CELEBRATING THE 231ST ANNIVERSARY OF THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES
Aug21
MARC JENSEN – HERMIONE’S “MARITIME AMBASSADOR”
Jul13
LAFAYETTE – HERO OF TWO WORLDS, THREE REVOLUTIONS
Jul3
CHEF WALTER STAIB VISITS HERMIONE TO FILM “A TASTE OF HISTORY” EPISODE
Jun25
MILES YOUNG RECEIVES NAVY LEAGUE’s LEADERSHIP AWARD
Jun11
FRENCH NAVY FRIGATE LA FAYETTE VISITS YORKTOWN COMMEMORATING FRANCO-AMERICAN ALLIANCE
Jun9
GALA CELEBRATES HERMIONE FRENCH FRIGATE OF LIBERTY ABOARD USS INTREPID on OCTOBER 14, 2014
May22
AHOY! SAVE THE DATE: OCT. 14, 2014 GALA ABOARD THE INTREPID TO CELEBRATE HERMIONE 2015 VOYAGE
Apr15
MEET ANNE RENAULT – HERMIONE’S SAILMAKER
Apr10
BEFORE NEW AMSTERDAM, NEW YORK WAS CALLED NEW ANGOULÊME!
Mar28
LAFAYETTE IN FOCUS AT UPCOMING MONTICELLO SYMPOSIUM
Mar25
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 7 – ANCHORS AWAY!
Mar18
YOU WOULD HAVE THOUGHT LAFAYETTE WAS A FAMOUS HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL
Feb23
DRUM ROLL FOR L’HERMIONE FROM SONS OF THE REVOLUTION!
Feb16
ADOPTED SON: WASHINGTON, LAFAYETTE, AND THE FRIENDSHIP THAT SAVED THE REVOLUTION
Feb6
VISIT TO MONTICELLO BY PRESIDENT OBAMA AND PRESIDENT HOLLANDE OF FRANCE
Feb3
FLORIDA TO SUPPORT LAFAYETTE’S 2015 HERMIONE VOYAGE
Feb2
PHILADELPHIA PREPARES FOR LAFAYETTE’S 2015 HERMIONE VOYAGE
Jan27
A FRENCH SILVER BOTTLE SLIDER: LAFAYETTE’S GIFT TO WASHINGTON
Jan16
MILES YOUNG BRINGS LESSONS OF L’HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE TO LYCEE FRANCAIS de NEW YORK
Jan14
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 6 – THE SPRITSAIL, SYMBOL OF ANCIENT NAVIGATION
Dec31
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 5: HERMIONE’S BALLAST: STABLE AND STRONG
Dec27
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 4: HERMIONE ARTISANS SET SAIL IN A RUSSIAN FRIGATE
Dec2
PBS – “LAFAYETTE: THE LOST HERO” AIRS 9PM, DECEMBER 3, 2013
Nov15
“RECREATING LAFAYETTE’S FRIGATE” IN THE NEW YORK TIMES
Nov11
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 3: POWERING THE HERMIONE
Sep26
NEW YORK WELCOMES HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE VOYAGE 2015 TO THE USA AT FRENCH CONSULATE RECEPTION ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2013
Sep25
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 2: GETTING THE DETAILS RIGHT
Sep25
WELCOME TO OUR BRAND NEW WEBSITE
Sep24
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 1: WELCOME!
Sep23
INTRODUCING OUR NEW LOGO
Sep19
AUTHENTICITY BUT WITH A TOUCH OF MODERNITY
Sep19
THE THIRD MAST IS INSTALLED
Jun15
RISING SPLENDOR
Apr4
L’HERMIONE GAINS HER FINAL TWO LOWER MASTS
Mar25
THE FIRST STAGE OF THE MAST CONSTRUCTION
Nov12
UNVEILING OF THE FIGUREHEAD
Mar31
MARCH 2012 PHOTO GALLERY BY PHILIP PLISSON
Jan20
REBIRTH OF THE BOAT LOCKS
Jan17
PREPARING FOR LAUNCH, PHASE 2: THE SHORING
Jan5
PREPARING FOR LAUNCH, PHASE 1: DISMANTLING THE TENT
Dec28
INSTALLATION OF THE ENGINES
Dec14
COMPLETION OF THE ORNAMENTS
Nov18
FLANGES FOR THE ENGINE
Nov15
END OF THE HULL’S PAINT JOB
Nov11
COMPLETION OF THE QUARTER GALLERIES
Jul8
THE RIGGING: START OF THE WORK
THE PERILS OF PEACE – CELEBRATING THE 231ST ANNIVERSARY OF THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES
AN INTERVIEW WITH THOMAS FLEMING, AMERICAN HISTORIAN September 2, 2014

A CONTEMPORARY PRINT OF THE SURRENDER OF CORNWALLIS. IN TRUTH, CORNWALLIS WAS NOT PRESENT AT THE SURRENDER, CLAIMING ILLNESS, AND SENT HIS SECOND IN COMMAND, GENERAL CHARLES O'HARA.

KING OF FRANCE, LOUIS XVI.

THIS UNFINISHED PORTRAIT OF AMERICAN SIGNATORIES - BRITAIN'S REPRESENTATIVES DECLINED TO POSE - BY CONTEMPORARY ARTIST BENJAMIN WEST, DEPICTS, LEFT TO RIGHT, JOHN JAY, JOHN ADAMS, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, HENRY LAURENS, AND WILLIAM TEMPLE FRANKLIN. PHOTO AND CAPTION: COURTESY OF HTTP://XENOPHONGROUP.COM/MCJOYNT/1783_TREATIES.HTM

QUEEN OF FRANCE, MARIE ANTOINETTE, AFTER A PORTRAIT BY ELISABETH VIGEE-LEBRUN.

Editor’s Note: On September 3, 2014,  America celebrates a largely forgotten, but an epochal anniversary: The 231st anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, in which Great Britain formally acknowledged the independence of the United States.

In the two-year period between Cornwallis’s surrender at Yorktown in October 1781 and achieving our independence in September 1783, there were many military, political and diplomatic setbacks in our fight for independence. Contrary to popular sentiments at the time in the wake of the British surrender, the war’s successful conclusion was by no means inevitable. Lack of funds to finance Washington’s army, bitter political infighting in our nascent Congress, and the clash of personalities among patriots all combined time and again to almost derail America’s quest for liberty.

Thomas Fleming, a distinguish American historian and best-selling novelist, author of “The Perils of Peace: America’s Struggle for Survival After Yorktown”, Smithsonian/Harper Collins, 2007, below depicts the hard-fought battles, the unrelenting political intrigues and delicate diplomatic talks that ultimately won our independence from King George III.

Question: Would you describe the set of challenges that the Revolution –and General Washington especially – faced after the great American-French victory at Yorktown?

Answer: Washington feared that Yorktown would convince many Americans that the war was over. This was anything but the case. The British still had 25,000 well-trained troops in America. The combined American and French regular armies barely totaled 10,000 men. In Philadelphia, the Continental Congress was torn by pro and anti French factions. In London, King George III grimly resolved to continue the fight. In Paris, King Louis XVI and his ministers faced imminent bankruptcy and were talking about a compromise peace that would leave the British in possession of Georgia, South Carolina, and the lower counties of New York, including New York City.

Q: Would you tell us about Washington’s relationship to young Lafayette?

 A: The forty-nine year old Washington had no children. The nineteen-year-old Marquis’s father had been killed in battle when he was two years old. Washington was charmed by the passion and courage with which the young French nobleman embraced the American cause. When Lafayette was wounded at the battle of Brandywine in 1777, Washington told an army doctor to “take care of him as if he were my own son.” Lafayette was soon calling Washington “my adopted father.” It was an intimacy that transcended politics.

Q: In Washington’s army “family,” there were several aides who also won his affection. Could you tell us about some of them?

A: Perhaps the least known was Tench Tilghman, a thirty-five year old Philadelphia merchant with family roots in Maryland. He served without pay (like Washington) for six long years. Washington gave him the honor of carrying the dispatch informing Congress of the Yorktown victory to Philadelphia. Another important man was 26-year-old Alexander Hamilton, who played many roles, from ghostwriter to political advisor.

At Yorktown he led the climactic assault on a key British redoubt, forcing Cornwallis to surrender. In the 1790s he won fame as President Washington’s brilliant Secretary of the Treasury. Another man Washington liked was Connecticut born David Humphreys. He was given the honor of carrying the flags of the captured British regiments to Philadelphia. Later he accompanied the General to Annapolis where he resigned his commission in 1783. None of these men achieved the father-son intimacy Lafayette won with his “adopted father” but all of them, especially Hamilton, made large contributions in the struggle for independence.

 Q:  Could you sketch Lafayette’s role in the run-up to peace negotiations with the British?

A: Lafayette was a crucial voice at the start of the post-Yorktown years. As he prepared to return to France, Washington wrote him a very serious letter, urging him to tell Louis XVI that the war was far from won and both nations would have to maintain a strong fleet as well as an army in America if they hoped to win. Wearing the uniform of an American major general, Lafayette’s arrival in Paris in 1781 caused a sensation. He joined Ambassador Benjamin Franklin in persuading the French to give the Americans an additional loan of 12,000,000 livres (about four million dollars) to keep the Revolution from collapsing. During the next months, Lafayette was consulted by both sides in the peace negotiations with the British, when their delegation came to Paris.

 Q: Why is Lafayette not better known – and more appreciated—in the United States?

 A: Lafayette was once extremely well known. When he returned in 1824 to help celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of Independence, he drew immense crowds in every city he visited. But in France, his fame has been damaged by the turbulent politics of the 1789 French Revolution. Lafayette and his allies lost control of that upheaval and it turned into a bloodbath (known as the Terror), forcing him to flee the country. Some radical Frenchman still view him with dislike. This may have affected his status among some Americans. But anyone who studies the Revolution soon comes to appreciate him.

 Q: How much credit does Lafayette merit for America’s independence?

 A: A great deal.  He – and his wife Adrienne’s influential family – were crucial voices in persuading France to sign a treaty of alliance with the American Revolutionists in 1778. The Marquis’s heroics on the battlefield won him great popularity – which helped change public opinion in France and thus influenced King Louis XVI and his cautious ministers.

In 1781, the Marquis was received by the King and Queen Marie Antoinette at their Versailles  – a crucial statement of royal support for the struggling Americans. It is not too much to say without Lafayette, there would have been no French alliance and no American independence.

 Q: In both America and France, Lafayette campaigned all his life for liberty and democratic principles – universal suffrage, an end to slavery, even to some extent for women’s rights. Was he a bit –or a lot — ahead of his times?

 A: He was only a bit ahead on universal suffrage. He was one of many voices pushing this idea. But he was a far ahead in calling for an end to slavery. Washington was shocked at first when Lafayette told him he would never have drawn his sword for America if he knew he was founding “a republic of slavery.” Lafayette’s stand changed Washington’s mind. When he became president, he began urging Americans to do something about slavery — and, don’t forget, he freed all his slaves in his will.

In my book, A Disease in the Public Mind, I call Washington our “forgotten emancipator.”  Lafayette deserves the credit for this transformation. As for women’s rights, I’m inclined to think the intense love he felt for his wife Adrienne was a step in this direction, at least in France. It was not fashionable to love one’s wife in aristocratic French circles.