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Aug8
HISTORIC RE-ENACTORS ADD AUTHENTICITY TO HERMIONE 2015 VOYAGE
Aug5
Say Au Revoir to The Hermione: Last Stop in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia Before Returning to France
Jul28
Lafayette at Monticello: “The Happy days I Have Past” : A Talk with Assistant Curator Emilie Johnson, Monticello
Jul21
A Talk with Ursula Reed, Chair, Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route, and Dr. Robert Selig, Historian, W3R-US
Jul18
HERMIONE MAKES A BIG IMPACT IN CASTINE, MAINE – ON BASTILLE DAY, JULY 14, 2015
Jul13
HERMIONE FRIGATE ARRIVES IN BOSTON TO TUMULTUOUS WELCOME ON JULY 11, 2015
Jul11
A Talk with David Dearinger, Curator of Lafayette: An American Icon at the Boston Athenæum
Jul10
Hermione Arrives in Historic Newport, Rhode Island
Jul9
Greenport, NY Greets Hermione with Great Fanfare July 6-7 Visit Warmly Welcomed on Long Island
Jul5
HERMIONE FRIGATE IN VIEW OF THE STATUE OF LIBERTY DURING JULY 4 PARADE OF SHIPS
Jul2
Triumphant Arrival of Hermione to New York’s Pier 15 at South Street Seaport Museum
Jun29
THE HERMIONE RE-ENACTMENT DINNER AT PHILADELPHIA’S CITY TAVERN IS AN AUTHENTIC BLAST! Marquis-mania Enlivens Philadelphia Waterfront with Tall Ships
Jun25
FRENCH-AMERICAN LIAISON EXTRAORDINAIRE: A TALK WITH NICOLE YANCEY
Jun22
HERMIONE’S BENEDICT DONNELLY SPEAKS IN ANNAPOLIS
Jun17
A Conversation with Paul Raschilla, Partner, AKF Group A Supporter of Hermione’s Visit to the Inner Harbor, Baltimore, Maryland
Jun10
Fireworks At Mount Vernon, Virginia During Hermione’s Visit on June 9, 2015
Jun8
Hermione Arrives In Yorktown With A Bang!
Jun2
Rendezvous of France’s Hermione and U.S. Navy’s USS Mitscher Off Virginia Coast
Jun1
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION HERMIONE-LA FAYETTE
May29
A Talk with Dr. Valerie Paley, New-York Historical Society on Its Current Exhibit: “Lafayette’s Return: The “Boy General,” the American Revolution, and the Hermione.”
May26
The Florida Friends of Hermione-Lafayette in America Host Four Successful Fundraisers Collecting $200,000
May7
Lafayette’s Arrival on April 27, 1780 Celebrated By Massachusetts Lafayette Society On Hancock’s Wharf, Boston
May5
Hermione-Lafayette President Miles Young Addresses Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island
Apr30
WORLD PREMIERE OF LAFAYETTE,
Apr13
LAFAYETTE, THE PLAY at FIAF’s Florence Gould Hall Theater in New York
Apr7
LAFAYETTE COMES ALIVE: A TALK WITH LAURENT FERRI, CURATOR AND ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, CORNELL UNIVERSITY
Apr2
Lafayette’s Key Role in the American Revolution is Celebrated in a New Society of the Cincinnati Exhibit
Mar25
FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA GATHER IN PALM BEACH FOR CELEBRATORY GALA
Mar24
Gérard Araud, French Ambassador Welcomes Friends of Hermione-Lafayette in America, Inc. at Washington, D.C. Reception
Mar18
PRINCE CHARLES LEARNS OF HERMIONE’S VISIT TO GEORGE WASHINGTON’S MOUNT VERNON
Mar15
Commonwealth of Virginia Declares March 14 as Lafayette Day
Mar14
Hermione Frigate Welcomes Hennessy on Board
Mar9
HERMIONE’S ARTISANAL ACHIEVEMENT
Feb18
AHOY! HERMIONE SETS SAIL TO AMERICA….AGAIN!
Feb14
French Language Students in New England Invited To Enter Hermione Contest
Jan31
Hermione-Lafayette Rallies Support in Coral Gables, Florida
Jan18
2015 – The Year of Hermione Comes to the United States
Dec23
FRANCE MAGAZINE DEVOTES COVER STORY TO THE HERMIONE!
Dec9
THE MARQUIS: LAFAYETTE RECONSIDERED
Dec8
FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA SALUTE OUR ARMED FORCES ON VETERANS DAY
Dec4
LAFAYETTE SYMPOSIUM AT LYCÉE FRANÇAIS DE NEW YORK
Dec4
NYC GATHERING WITH MILES YOUNG, PRESIDENT, FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA
Dec3
BRITISH TRAVEL WRITERS COMMEND HERMIONE FRIGATE PROJECT IN 2014
Nov12
ABOARD HERMIONE: MARC JENSEN’S LOG NOTES
Oct15
GALA HIGHLIGHTS FROM FRIENDS OF HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA ON THE USS INTREPID
Oct14
FOH-LA’S MARC JENSEN ON BOARD HERMIONE IN BORDEAUX!
Oct10
HERMIONE’S TRIUMPHAL ARRIVAL IN BORDEAUX!
Sep16
THE SIEGE WILL COMMENCE TOMORROW AT YORKTOWN
Sep8
HERMIONE ON ITS WAY TO THE ATLANTIC!
Sep6
HAPPY BIRTHDAY LAFAYETTE!
Sep2
THE PERILS OF PEACE – CELEBRATING THE 231ST ANNIVERSARY OF THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES
Aug21
MARC JENSEN – HERMIONE’S “MARITIME AMBASSADOR”
Jul13
LAFAYETTE – HERO OF TWO WORLDS, THREE REVOLUTIONS
Jul3
CHEF WALTER STAIB VISITS HERMIONE TO FILM “A TASTE OF HISTORY” EPISODE
Jun25
MILES YOUNG RECEIVES NAVY LEAGUE’s LEADERSHIP AWARD
Jun11
FRENCH NAVY FRIGATE LA FAYETTE VISITS YORKTOWN COMMEMORATING FRANCO-AMERICAN ALLIANCE
Jun9
GALA CELEBRATES HERMIONE FRENCH FRIGATE OF LIBERTY ABOARD USS INTREPID on OCTOBER 14, 2014
May22
AHOY! SAVE THE DATE: OCT. 14, 2014 GALA ABOARD THE INTREPID TO CELEBRATE HERMIONE 2015 VOYAGE
Apr15
MEET ANNE RENAULT – HERMIONE’S SAILMAKER
Apr10
BEFORE NEW AMSTERDAM, NEW YORK WAS CALLED NEW ANGOULÊME!
Mar28
LAFAYETTE IN FOCUS AT UPCOMING MONTICELLO SYMPOSIUM
Mar25
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 7 – ANCHORS AWAY!
Mar18
YOU WOULD HAVE THOUGHT LAFAYETTE WAS A FAMOUS HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL
Feb23
DRUM ROLL FOR L’HERMIONE FROM SONS OF THE REVOLUTION!
Feb16
ADOPTED SON: WASHINGTON, LAFAYETTE, AND THE FRIENDSHIP THAT SAVED THE REVOLUTION
Feb6
VISIT TO MONTICELLO BY PRESIDENT OBAMA AND PRESIDENT HOLLANDE OF FRANCE
Feb3
FLORIDA TO SUPPORT LAFAYETTE’S 2015 HERMIONE VOYAGE
Feb2
PHILADELPHIA PREPARES FOR LAFAYETTE’S 2015 HERMIONE VOYAGE
Jan27
A FRENCH SILVER BOTTLE SLIDER: LAFAYETTE’S GIFT TO WASHINGTON
Jan16
MILES YOUNG BRINGS LESSONS OF L’HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE TO LYCEE FRANCAIS de NEW YORK
Jan14
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 6 – THE SPRITSAIL, SYMBOL OF ANCIENT NAVIGATION
Dec31
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 5: HERMIONE’S BALLAST: STABLE AND STRONG
Dec27
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 4: HERMIONE ARTISANS SET SAIL IN A RUSSIAN FRIGATE
Dec2
PBS – “LAFAYETTE: THE LOST HERO” AIRS 9PM, DECEMBER 3, 2013
Nov15
“RECREATING LAFAYETTE’S FRIGATE” IN THE NEW YORK TIMES
Nov11
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 3: POWERING THE HERMIONE
Sep26
NEW YORK WELCOMES HERMIONE-LAFAYETTE VOYAGE 2015 TO THE USA AT FRENCH CONSULATE RECEPTION ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2013
Sep25
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 2: GETTING THE DETAILS RIGHT
Sep25
WELCOME TO OUR BRAND NEW WEBSITE
Sep24
CAPTAIN’S CHRONICLE NO. 1: WELCOME!
Sep23
INTRODUCING OUR NEW LOGO
Sep19
AUTHENTICITY BUT WITH A TOUCH OF MODERNITY
Sep19
THE THIRD MAST IS INSTALLED
Jun15
RISING SPLENDOR
Apr4
L’HERMIONE GAINS HER FINAL TWO LOWER MASTS
Mar25
THE FIRST STAGE OF THE MAST CONSTRUCTION
Nov12
UNVEILING OF THE FIGUREHEAD
Mar31
MARCH 2012 PHOTO GALLERY BY PHILIP PLISSON
Jan20
REBIRTH OF THE BOAT LOCKS
Jan17
PREPARING FOR LAUNCH, PHASE 2: THE SHORING
Jan5
PREPARING FOR LAUNCH, PHASE 1: DISMANTLING THE TENT
Dec28
INSTALLATION OF THE ENGINES
Dec14
COMPLETION OF THE ORNAMENTS
Nov18
FLANGES FOR THE ENGINE
Nov15
END OF THE HULL’S PAINT JOB
Nov11
COMPLETION OF THE QUARTER GALLERIES
Jul8
THE RIGGING: START OF THE WORK
Lafayette at Monticello: “The Happy days I Have Past” : A Talk with Assistant Curator Emilie Johnson, Monticello
July 28, 2015

On the occasion of Lafayette’s reunion with Jefferson at Monticello in 1824, Lafayette presented this gift to the fourth President of the United States, an inkwell in the shape of Voltaire’s head, glaze ceramic, n.d. Photo courtesy of Monticello/Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc.

“I well remember the visit of Gen. Lafayette to Monticello. The whole place was in gala array in his honor. He was met at Red Gate and escorted to Monticello by the Jefferson Guards and the Virginia Militia.” Special to the Sunday World. Cincinnati, Ohio, 29 January 1898, in article about Rev. Peter F. Fossett, is probably the last surviving, former slave of Thomas JeffersonPhoto courtesy of http://usslave.blogspot.com/2013/08/the-rev-mr-fossett-of-cincinnati-former.html

Engraving depicting Lafayette’s Welcome to Jefferson’s Monticello in 1825.Photo courtesy of http://usslave.blogspot.com/2013/08/the-rev-mr-fossett-of-cincinnati-former.html

Mary Randolph’s Memory Book, 1825–1908. Loaned by a member of the Coolidge family.Photo courtesy of Monticello/Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc.

Editor’s Note: A new exhibition at Monticello in Charlottesville, Virginia, celebrates the lasting friendship between Lafayette and Jefferson. Open to the public and housed in in the David M. Rubenstein Visitor Center, the current exhibit runs from August 1, 2015 through January 15, 2016.

 Featuring select items from Monticello’s collection, the exhibit was assembled by Emilie Johnson, Ph.D., Assistant Curator at Monticello; she specializes in late 18th and early 19th century American cultural landscapes, architecture, and material culture, with a particular focus on plantations. A graduate of Wake Forest University, Johnson holds an M.A. in Art History from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art and her doctorate in Art and Architectural History from the University of Virginia. At Monticello, she plans special exhibitions, including this one about Lafayette and another about Jefferson’s visit to Shakespeare’s house in Stratford in 1786.

 

Emilie Johnson recently met with David Lincoln Ross, Editorial Director, Friends of Hermione-Lafayette in America at Monticello to talk about the friendship between Lafayette and Jefferson.

 Question:   What was the background and thinking about creating this special Jefferson-Lafayette exhibition?

EJ:   With an upsurge of interest in Lafayette, thanks to the Hermione’s voyage to the United States and Laura Auricchio’s recent biography, The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered, it was an opportune time to celebrate Lafayette’s visits to Monticello and his long friendship with Jefferson with a small exhibition.

The title of the exhibition — Lafayette at Monticello: “The Happy days I Have Past”­ – comes from a letter Lafayette wrote to Jefferson a few days after he left Monticello. Lafayette stated “The Happy days I Have Past at Monticello Are over; But they Have Left on My Heart an Impression Never to Be efaced.”

Susan Stein, the Richard Gilder Senior Curator and Vice President of Museum Programs, thought this was a great idea and the project received support from staff across Monticello.

Q: What are some of the highlights from Monticello’s exhibition, items that have not been seen before by the public and their either historical significance or of a deeply personal character.

EJ:   This exhibition combines objects from Monticello’s collections and objects loaned to us from generous collectors. The inkwell in the shape of Voltaire’s head is a delightful object with an intriguing connection to Lafayette’s 1824 visit. Family lore claims that Lafayette brought the inkwell to Jefferson when he came to Monticello.

In the exhibition, the inkwell is paired with a fragmentary volume of British author Frances Wright’s A few days in Athens, being the translation of a Greek manuscript discovered in Herculaneum, published in 1822. Jefferson filled seven pages of his literary commonplace book with excerpts from the book, and described it as “equal to the best morsels of antiquity.” High praise, indeed! The inscription on the flyleaf, though badly mutilated, reads “from Thomas Jefferson to La F . . ., Nov 4,” suggesting that Jefferson gave his prized copy to his dear friend upon his arrival. Adding layers to the significance of this object was the connection between Wright and Lafayette. She was his protégé, and Frances Wright and her sister traveled with Lafayette on parts of the American tour. The Misses Wright arrived at Monticello only a day or two after Lafayette.

With her father, Martha Jefferson Randolph hosted a welcoming dinner for Lafayette on the evening of his arrival. Accounts of the dinner suggest about twenty guests, including many of Jefferson’s grandchildren and their spouses. A satin dress shoe like this might have been worn by one of the granddaughters or granddaughters-in-law for the celebration.

Lafayette’s return to Monticello in August 1825 was shorter and more poignant. Jefferson’s health had declined in the ensuing ten months, the family’s financial straits had not improved, and Lafayette must have known it would be the last time he would see his friends. The General left a souvenir for one of Jefferson’s granddaughters, a touching message in her autograph book that read “I am the first to write on Your Book, dear Mary Jefferson Randolph: the first I shall Ever be Among Your friends to love You and Your dear family, to Bestow Upon You, in Every Circumstance of Your life, the paternal good Wishes and feelings Which I am Happy to Be Entitled to Express.” Lafayette’s message reveals the multi-generational friendships that he formed with members of the Jefferson family.

Q: Why is Monticello so special to understanding Jefferson the man?

EJ:   Monticello has been called Thomas Jefferson’s three-dimensional autobiography. Since 1923, curators, historians, and restorers have been working to re-create Monticello as Jefferson knew it and have collected furniture, objects, books, and works of art that Jefferson owned and used at Monticello.

Lafayette had a very strong presence at Monticello. In 1790, Jefferson commissioned a portrait of the General from French artist Joseph Boze. Jefferson’s painting is now at the Massachusetts Historical Society, and a copy hangs in Monticello’s parlor as it did during Jefferson’s lifetime. Jefferson displayed a plaster bust of Lafayette by Houdon in his “gallery of worthies” in the Tea Room. Jefferson had at least one engraving of Lafayette. Lafayette surely saw the Boze portrait and Houdon bust, and possibly the engraving, when he visited in 1824 and 1825.

Q:   How many times Lafayette paid a visit to Jefferson, and are there any journal entries or documents that show what Jefferson might have served in foods and drink during his stay, you might reference the Dining at Monticello Cookbook.

EJ:   We only know of Lafayette making two visits to Monticello, the first in November 1824, near the beginning of his triumphal tour of America, and the last in August 1825, shortly before Lafayette departed America to return home. His 1824 visit lasted ten days, while his second visit was only four-days long.

Lafayette enjoyed many dinners at Monticello, accompanied by old friends, invited guests, and members of Jefferson’s family. Menus have not survived, but we can imagine the diners consumed vegetables from Monticello’s extensive gardens and meat dishes. Lamb and mutton were popular on Jefferson’s table, and Jefferson particularly enjoyed a boiled beef roast known as Boulli. On November 4, 1824, James Madison was late to the welcoming dinner, only arriving as the guests were drinking wine after dinner. The wine was likely French, and could have been Ledanon, Bergasse claret, Clairette de Limoux, Muscat de Rivesalte, or brandy, all of which were in the wine cellar at Monticello in 1824. (Editor’s Note: Though no longer called as such, “Ledanon” and “Bergasse claret”, are from vineyards located in present-day Rhône Valley appellations in France; that is red wines likely made from a blend Syrah, Grenache and Mourvèdre grapes.”) If you want to learn more about dining, socializing, cuisine, and wine, I suggest looking at Dining at Monticello, 2005, Thomas Jefferson Foundation.

Q:   While Jefferson and Lafayette were not as close as Lafayette and Washington, tell us from your readings how you would describe the friendship over the decades? Did they correspond as often as Washington and Lafayette?

EJ:   Whereas the relationship between Washington and Lafayette has been described as paternal and filial, Jefferson and Lafayette interacted as peers. They first met in 1781, when Jefferson was the Governor of Virginia and Lafayette was leading troops through the region, ultimately against Cornwallis at Yorktown. They reunited in Paris in January 1785. Lafayette had just returned from the United States, and brought with him news of the death of Jefferson’s daughter, Lucy Elizabeth.

Throughout the rest of Jefferson’s time in Paris, they saw each other frequently. Lafayette introduced Jefferson to his powerful network of relatives and friends, contacts that were invaluable to Jefferson’s mission of solidifying American political and economic interests in France. After Jefferson returned to the United States in 1789, their correspondence continued, resulting in at least 185 letters between the two men from 1781 to 1825.

Q: Lastly, while visiting with you, you talked with great interest about the strong connection between Lafayette and Jefferson’s daughter? Tell us about that friendship, and did it extend after Jefferson’s death on July 4 1826?

In 1784, Lafayette wrote to his wife Adrienne :

“I must not forget, dear heart, to commend to your attention Mr. and Miss Jefferson.  The father, an admirable, cultivated and charming man, overwhelmed me with kindnesses when he was Governor of Virginia during the war, and I very much hope that he may like France well enough to wish to replace Mr. Franklin, which will not be difficult to manage should he consent.  As to the daughter, she is a very attractive young woman, and I here and now appoint you to be her mother, chaperone and anything else you can think of. I beg you to take them under your wing, and to do all you can for them … It would be no bad thing if you took them to see Madame de Tessé.”

Lafayette’s 1824 and 1825 visits to Monticello renewed his friendship with Martha Jefferson Randolph, the “very attractive young woman” Lafayette had asked his wife to mentor in 1784. During his stay at Monticello, Lafayette met Martha’s children (some of whom were close to her age during her years in Paris). Re-acquaintance kindled powerful memories for both Lafayette and Martha Randolph. Lafayette’s message in Mary Randolph’s memory book is a poignant indication of Lafayette’s affectionate regard for Jefferson’s daughter and grandchildren.

Martha wrote Lafayette immediately before he left the United States for France. Lafayette responded to her upon his return to LaGrange, but did not hear anything more from Martha, or her father, before Jefferson’s death on July 4, 1826.

In August of that year, Lafayette had learned the news and wrote Martha a letter in which he asked her “Be so kind as to write to me, my dear unhappy friend, tell me every particular respecting the family, to whom I beg you to ofer my condoling, affectionate Regards.”